News from Handeaux


























  1. "Meet On The Ledge" by Fairport Convention

  2. The Smithsonian, of all places, got the name wrong and the error has been recopied in almost every story about this event. The family name was Beagle.

  3. That might mean $50 insured, so much less than that as a fee to purchase that insurance.

  4. Correct. They insured the child for $50. It probably cost a quarter or less to do so.

  5. I was talking about the lines and imprints on the shell itself, more so.

  6. People get married for reasons? We’ve been married for 47 years now and I don’t think I ever thought of a reason. It just seemed right.

  7. I was hoping Boudinot would be on here! Great blog post still! I’m a Cincinnati transplant, and I love Cincinnati history. I also really enjoyed hearing you speak a few weeks ago at the Observatory.

  8. Boudinot is historic, but not really curious. Elias Boudinot was a New Jersey politician who got involved in a land deal with John Cleves Symmes - who had purchased all the land between the Miami Rivers. Like most deals involving Symmes, it went south. Several lawsuits. Boudinot Avenue marks the boundary of the property he purchased.

  9. The spillway at Caesar Creek yields tons of Flexis, but they tend to be small. Almost every roadcut around has yielded good specimens, but you have to train yourself to spot them. Advise joining the Dry Dredgers and attending some of their field trips to learn from the experienced collectors.

  10. I can't really do or afford that since I'm a Michigander. I'm also only just now turning 18... But thanks for the advice!

  11. Next time you travel through, try roadcuts on state routes, particularly around Oxford, Ohio, or in Northern Kentucky. Good luck!

  12. Where i Indiana? Lots of different strata in that state.

  13. The easiest way to determine the age of a fossil is to identify the age of the rock in which it was preserved. The easiest way to determine the age of the rock is to know its location.

  14. It would help if you provided accurate location information for this specimen.

  15. I don't know how much more specific I can be. In the middle of the finger lakes region of NY if you want more general.

  16. Here is a geologic map of New York:

  17. It would help to have more specific location information to help identify the geologic age.

  18. 1-5 are rocks. 6-9 are probably rocks but need better photos.

  19. Several paleontology programs arrange field trips to the Bahamas, where depositional environments are apparently similar to the environments that produced fossils from the past.

  20. That is a fossilized brachiopod. Brachiopods do not produce pearls.

  21. True story: The Cincinnati Observatory offered free viewing through an 1845-era telescope all through Halley's 1986 appearance. I went one night and found a long line to get to the scope. When I finally got to the front, a woman of some years was the only person ahead of me. I heard her say something and I assumed she was talking to me so I said I had not heard her comment. She said, "Oh, no, young man, I was talking to the comet. My father brought me to this observatory to see it in 1910 and I don't think I will see it again, so I was saying goodbye."

  22. That looks very much like igneous rock. Igneous rock won't have fossils.

  23. Almost textbook example of a septarian nodule.

  24. I know nothing about rocks, but I wonder if there's a geode on the inside?

  25. Not always foolproof, but a good way to tell if it is a geode is to shake it. Geodes are normally hollow and quite often have a loose crystal or two rattling around. No rattle? Likely not a geode.

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